Interstate Rest Stops

Greetings dear readers. Apologies for once again neglecting the blog. Brenda and I have been travelling extensively this past year and some things like the blog have been placed on the back burner. The good news is that I will have a lot of new material to write about and post pictures about. Photo adventures in South Texas and Arkansas, Smokies (Autumn), Nevada, California and the Galapagos Islands should provide fodder for future posts. I’ll be spending much of this summer editing and catching up on the huge backlog of recent material.

This entry is about making photographs in unlikely places such as Interstate Rest Stops. Brenda and I will shortly be travelling to Arkansas and Texas for spring scenery and birds. We usually travel to our US destinations via the Interstate highway system. Occasionally we will drive secondary roads if there is a possibility we are missing something on the way. The Interstate Highway system is a fast, efficient and reasonably safe means of getting from Point A to B. Interstates can be boring from a photographic standpoint, although some, like I70 (in Utah) pass through jaw dropping landscapes. Interstates generally prohibit stopping, unless there is an emergency. I don’t think a state trooper would be amused if I tried to explain that my emergency stop was for taking a picture.

While driving to the Smokies in springtime it became apparent that the best redbud in bloom would be found well north, in this case Ohio

While driving to the Smokies in springtime it became apparent that the best redbud in bloom would be found well north, in this case at an I75 Ohio Rest Stop.

The system includes Rest Stops every 50 miles (80 km) or so and these are well maintained and convenient places to change drivers, go to the bathroom or have a bite to eat if weather is cooperating. There can be photo opportunities at rest stops. Often there is information describing something of historic or geographic significance in the area. Usually there is a picnic area and a place to exercise the dog and stretch one’s legs. One needs to set aside pre-conceived notions about these places and have the camera ready if opportunities arise. My tripod and camera bag are always accessible when we stop.

While we had lunch I tried to time the passing vehicles travelling in the opposite direction, between the oak trees

While we had lunch in North Dakota I tried to time the passing vehicles travelling in the opposite direction, between the oak trees

Here is a selection of other images I have made over the years at these Rest Stops. Please enjoy.

A stand of young trees in Minnesota

A stand of young trees in Minnesota

Late autumn colour and early snow in Michigan

Late autumn colour and early snow in Michigan along I75.

Frost for hundreds of km in North Dakota. Unfortunately it petered out before Roosevelt National Park was reached.

Frost for hundreds of km along I94 in North Dakota. Unfortunately it petered out before Roosevelt National Park was reached.

The NC/SC state line rest stop proved to be a welcome respite from a late winter snow storm in the Carolinas.

The NC/SC state line rest stop proved to be a welcome respite from a late winter snow storm in the Carolinas.

This I 25 Rest Stop was an ideal locale for photographing the fresh snow near the Rio Salado sand dunes in New Mexico.

This I 25 Rest Stop was an ideal locale for photographing the fresh snow near the Rio Salado sand dunes in New Mexico.

Staying With the Plan

Since I last posted Spring has blasted through and swept winter aside. Almost two weeks or so of above average temperatures in early May has led to an avalanche of green in the aspens and birches. During this time I have been setting the alarm for pre-dawn excursions to spots close to home. A few days ago I decided to revisit a beaver pond as the temperatures hovered just above freezing with clear skies. I expected fog and was not disappointed. But as I parked and set up and assessed the situation I realized that conditions would not (apparently) be as promising as I anticipated. There seemed to be too much fog

 

 

 

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Out of desperation I decided to stay and make the best of this mediocre dawning. I reasoned that if I weighed anchor and charted a course to other destinations on my short list I might be travelling during sunrise and wasting what good light there might be that morning.

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Shortly the sun began to add colour to the sky and peek through the fog. It was now producing sufficient definition in the shoreline trees to attempt landscape images containing discernable features.

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The one picture element I thought might rescue this image was a lone Canada goose floating motionless near a small rock outcrop. Although small, it’s silhouette contrasted well with the fog. Likely the goose was behaving as a sentinel for his mate on her nest. As the sun rose a little higher the goose held its position. Soon the motionless goose commanded more of my attention as the sun turned the mist to a golden colour.

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As the sun continued to rise above the mist I realized that I had better exclude it from the images as it was overpowering the digital sensor, even with the use of a graduated neutral density filter.

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Fortunately I packed my long lens that morning and I began using it to isolate the goose in the sunlit fog.

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By moving my tripod a couple of meters I could omit the sun’s direct reflection.

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Finally, back to shorter lenses before the sun got too high.

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